Throwing Forehand

Learning how to throw a forehand, or flick, is an essential skill for every ultimate player. Most defenders will try to force you to throw to one side of the field or the other, so being able to throw both a strong forehand and backhand ensures you always have a good throwing option.


The Grip

There are a few variations on forehand grips, and just like the backhand, as you throw more you will figure out what works best for you. The two most common grips are:

1. Split finger

  • More accurate, less powerful

 

  • Make a “V” with your middle and index and place these two fingers under the disc. Your middle finger should be snug against the rim on the underside of the disc, and your index finger should point toward the centre.
  • Place your thumb on the top of the disc, not too close to the rim in a position where it is comfortable. The other two fingers are curled loosely in your palm.


2. Power grip

  • More potential power, takes more practice to be accurate

   

Begin as above but the index finger, instead of pointing toward the middle, can slide beside the middle finger on the rim of the disc, as if you were pointing a gun.


The Body Position

Your body should be positioned so you are looking upfield toward your endzone. Stand on the balls of your feet with your legs shoulder-width apart and your knees slightly bent. The elbow of your throwing arm should be close to your side.


The Moves

The motion of the forehand throw is fluid and the steps below all happen pretty close together.

RIGHT-HANDED throwers

  • Lunge. Begin by stepping out to the side and a little bit forward with your right leg, keeping the toes of your left foot firmly planted on the ground.
  • Elbow back. Draw your elbow back behind you, so your hand with the disc in it is about even with or behind the plane of your body.
  • Elbow forward. Leaning slightly over to your right-hand side to keep the disc flat, leading with your elbow, move your arm forward at about hip level.
  • Wrist snap. Quickly follow the elbow with your wrist with a quick snapping motion, like a whip.
  • Elbow straighten and finger snap. Straighten your elbow quickly to create another quick snapping motion that culminates with a (sometimes audible!) finger snap.

  

  

  

LEFT-HANDED throwers

  • Lunge. Begin by stepping out to the side and a little bit forward with your left leg, keeping the toes of your right foot firmly planted on the ground.
  • Elbow back. Draw your elbow back behind you, so your hand with the disc in it is about even with or behind the plane of your body.
  • Elbow forward. Leaning slightly over to your left-hand side to keep the disc flat, leading with your elbow, move your arm forward at about hip level.
  • Wrist snap. Quickly follow the elbow with your wrist with a quick snapping motion, like a whip.
  • Elbow straighten and finger snap. Straighten your elbow quickly to create another quick snapping motion that culminates with a (sometimes audible!) finger snap.

The Release

Before you release the disc, it should be flat.

  • Snap your wrist.
  • Let go of the disc at the end of the snap.
  • Follow through.  Once the frisbee has been released your arm should be extended and twisted, with the throwing hand in a palm-up position with fingers splayed in a twisted motion as though you’ve just unscrewed the top of an upside-down jar of jam. Your index and middle finger should be pointed pretty close to where you wanted the frisbee to go.

The faster you release the disc the more spin it will have, which provides accuracy, distance and lets the disc fly flat.