Bike to Work ?

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"Translink talks the talk, but they really do nothing to encourage people to make alternative cycling arrangements...... "

Bit of a blanket statement, considering all that they HAVE done to encourage cycling e.g. bike network and map, preferential lights at intersections with bike routes.

One suggestion: take it up with Falcon - Who continues to deny Translink's recognition as a regional transit authority and the associated provincial funding. But even in an ideal world (ie: endless funds) they will never be able to make everyone happy, especially those commuting from the burbs. Urban sprawl is the culprit, not the transit provider.

oh, and dont take that as a crack at suburban residents - but more as a critique of current planning regimes.

M

Hey YourMom,

I've lived all over, city, country , suburbs. Each has its benefits and drawbacks. I dont take your statement as a crack. With housing prices as insane as they currently are, many people with young families have decided to put their best interests ahead of ideology. I live in a neighbourhood full of ex-Vancouverites.

Urban sprawl will always be with us to some extent. It is human nature to want your own space. Some just prefer more than others. Rats in forced to live in close confines will eventually go crazy. That happened to me after living in the city for too long as well. I started to hate people. I had to move away. Now I love the city again that I can ride my bike through it and I dont have to worry about everything I own being stolen every day.

You should read a good book about planning called Suburban Nation - Death of the American Dream. Really comprehensive look at the outcomes of sprawl.

ta ta

Bagger

"With housing prices as insane as they currently are, many people with young families have
decided to put their best interests ahead of ideology."

What best interests? Driving for a couple hours a day instead of hanging at home with your
kids?

re: human nature... actually we've always lived in pretty close quarters, until the advent of
cheap gas and the ability to ignore problems like where our garbage goes, etc. People with
space used to use that land to be self-sufficient... not sure what the benefit of a patch of
grass in the backyard might be.

"Rats in forced to live in close confines will eventually go crazy. That happened to me after
living in the city for too long as well. I started to hate people."

City living made you crazy and you started to hate people? Hmmm, yet so many of us
manage just fine. Maybe the problem wasn't the city, but your attitude? Also, I don't have
figures at hand, but my non-existent criminology degree tells me that crime rates probably
aren't that different from the city to the suburbs... esp. property crime.

I live in the city. Mt. Un-Pleasant as a matter of fact. And yet, within a 10 minute bike ride
of my home I have skating rinks, swimming pools, Skytrain and bus access, my job,
shopping, several parks, and so on.

Suburbs have very little going for them. I would argue almost nothing, except a chance to
fatten the wallet of your local auto dealer.

"Suburbs have very little going for them. I would argue almost nothing, except a chance to fatten the wallet of your local auto dealer."

Very little??

What about the freedom to mow and care for your 12x12 foot lawn every two weeks? Or the freedom to catch up on the latest music or news while sitting in your car for 2 or 3 hours a day? What about the ability to go through Starbucks or your local bank in the drive-thru lane, you just can't beat that convenience.

That's just a small list...seems to me you're missing out Stump!

emd By emd

"Suburbs have very little going for them. I would argue almost nothing, except a chance to fatten the wallet of your local auto dealer."

I would live in the city if I could get 1500-2000 sq ft house (non-strata) with a small yard that was near a nice park for < $500K (which I can't afford anyway) that didn't look like it was built in 1923.

Hey EMD, if you find one that meets your criteria except that it looks like it was built in 1923 let me know.

yes, read that one.

"ideology"? For me it is the sweet ~$10,000 per year I save not needing to own/drive a car. It is also the exercise and health benefits of walking/biking for groceries and to/from work; the markedly better air quality; easy access to transit; oh and the $5 frappiccinos - can't forget those.

The financial argument is fair - as long as the long term savings of not needing 2 cars is factored in, and it still doesnt work out in the long term.
hey check this out: http://www.locationefficiency.com/
certainly something to think about - i think VanCity is exploring the possibility of offering these. Correct me if I'm wrong - any other local banks looking at these?

"human nature to want your own space" - yes of course, but millions and millions of humans have figured out ways to live in much less of their own space, and to enjoy more and more shared, community-based space. Just because we have lots of Canadian land doesnt mean we are entitled to more of it. [insert plethora of arguments re growing and buying food locally (on what land?), which i'm too lazy to write now]

emd By emd

Will do Dugly.

Interesting related article on BBC:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/6899082.stm

Paris is deploying 750 communal bike racks that will be used like tiny self propelled buses. Apparently Lyon already has a system like this that is successful.

Although, even compared to Vancouver, biking in Paris must be a scary venture.

It's a great idea that's catching on. We'll really be able to make some progress in reducing the
amount of space required for cars when we expand the program to include automobiles... and
public transit service is vastly improved to fill the gaps.

Imagine how many fewer parking spaces we would need if we could simply grab a car when we
needed one instead of having to have our own and find spots to keep it etc. More parks, more
community gardens, more land for homes and bike lanes and buses and playgrounds and and
and.... We have nothing to lose and everything to gain.

My dream is a world where cars are treated as a utility to be used when necessary, not a fetish-
ized representation of status.

http://www.streetsblog.org/2007/08/09/congressman-ridicules-bikes-as-19t...

"Ladies and gentlemen, I bring you the Democrats, promoting 19th century solutions to 21st century problems. If you don't like it, ride a bike. If you don't like the price at the pumps, ride a bike. Stay tuned for the next big idea for the Democrats: Improving energy efficiency by the horse and buggy."

good stuff!

emd By emd

A link about a family who got rid of their car..in Southern Cali no less!!

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