disc ob or not

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#1

I am pretty sure this was asked before but I couldn't find it.
Offensive team hucks the disc down field near the sideline. The disc flies out of bound and never comes in. However, before the disc touch the ground, an offensive player attempts a greatest but the disc was not able to come back in bound. Now since the offensive player is an in bound object while in the air, so does the offensive player touching the disc make the disc in bound too? Now does the defending team start play at where the throw went out or where the disc was touched by the in bound player?

Here's the scenario as I understand it: Offensive player jumps from IB, touches the disc while
in the air, lands OB while still touching the disc.

The disc becomes OB as soon as the O lands OB with the disc in possession. Since the disc
was contacting an IB player the very moment before it became OB, then IX.H.2 applies and
the disc would come back in play on the playing field proper (not in the end zone) nearest to
where the O player landed. This would happen even if the O subsequently threw the disc onto
the field after he had already become OB (what happens after the disc is OB doesn't count).

To quote myself*: "That's why a really smart player on O will know that even though the
catch/greatest is hopeless jumping for a disc from IB is still worthwhile, as they'll single-
handedly push the other team all the way back down the field from where they would have
taken the disc where it crossed the perimeter line.

If The Greatest is snatching victory from the jaws of defeat by saving an OB pass, and The
Stupidest is snatching defeat from the jaws of victory by unsuccessfully trying The Greatest
on a disc that's IB, then perhaps this would be The Cunningest (The Slyest, The Alertest)?"

* From this thread: http://www.vul.bc.ca/v3/forum/forum_message_display.cfm?
FirstMessageID=27338

If I read the original post correctly, I think the author is saying that the receiver leapt from IB, caught the disc whilst airborne outside the perimeter line, and threw it before landing OB -- but that the disc eventually landed OB nevertheless.

Even so, the outcome would be the same as Temple says. Just be sure to note that the disc does not itself become "out-of-bounds" until it actually touches an OB person, area, or object. When it does finally touch one of these things, it is put back into play into one of several possible places described by rule IX.H (the "most recent event rule").

In this case, if I've understood it correctly, the disc most recently touched an IB player, so rule IX.H.2 applies, as Temple describes.

Ah true. If the disc was thrown while the thrower was IB, then you have to determine if it
crosses the perimeter line or not.

If it arcs over the field, but flies back out, then it will be put into play closest to where it last
left the field.

"Wiley-est" has a nice ring to it.

Thanks for the replies.
The disc would be put into play where closest to the field where it last touched the IB player.
Its pretty hard to convince the other team that this is the case especially when they are the offending team that will lose a whole field of yards.

"Its pretty hard to convince the other team that this is the case especially when they are the
offending team that will lose a whole field of yards."

Wrong is wrong, but on-field is not the place to hash that out, so you've got to accept the rules
ignorance in stride. How did you guys compromise? Did you split the difference or just accept
their decision?

Sometimes it's difficult to have somebody show you how you were mistaken, but I recommend
revisiting rule disputes on the sideline (usually I wait until the end of the game). If you approach
the other person in a friendly and non-confrontational way, you can make the discussion a
learning experience, rather than a correction of the other person.

Well, your convincing argument to that other team could always start with, "Has ANYONE on your entire team EVER actually READ the rules?".

Too forward?

"Well, your convincing argument to that other team could always start with, "Has ANYONE on
your entire team EVER actually READ the rules?"."

But that pre-supposes that anybody on Carlos' entire team had ever read the rules...

Remember being correct doesn't give you the right to argue 'what you've heard' or how 'you've
always played'. If you've never read the rules, then you should assume that your take on the
rules is just as valid as theirs (even if Temple said so).

In the end, I just accepted their decision because there's no way they're going to agree on what I said about the disc becomes IB when it touches an IB player. To them, the disc never came in and that's that. After the point, I did talk to them but they still didn't believe me.

It's probably true that no one on my team have read the rules except for me. Even players in my team (including the IB player who touched the disc in the air) believe that the disc should be back at where it went out when it was thrown. Basically, it was everyone against me. So even thought I know the rules, majority wins.