out of bound?

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A disc is thrown out of bound and picked up by a handler. Handler checks the disc in on the sideline with the pivot foot being in bound but the other foot out of bound. So in this case, is the handler in bound or out of bound?
I mean I can keep both foot in bound first and then take a step out to throw, but if that happened to me and someone called "out" on me. Would it be a TO? If not, is it "contestable"?
My knowledge to this is that I'm in bound because my pivot foot is inbound.
Also, if a player checks a disc in when his is out of bound (after picking up the disc on a TO), is he "Out" and a turnover would occur?
I found it while writing this XIII.B
"For a live disc to be put into play, the thrower must establish a pivot at the appropriate spot on the field, touch the disc to the ground and put it into play. "
So if the player checks the disc in while out of bound, the disc is not put into play.
Then what can the defender call?
Violation?

to add to this, if the handler (checks the disc in while out of bound) throws the disc, is it in play? Does it matter if the marker calls a violation on the thrower to make the disc in play or not? If the marker tells the thrower that he's out and yet he threw the disc, if it's a completed pass, what's the call? If it's not a completed pass, what's the call?

You're definitely on the right track, and good work for checking out the rules yourself.

Ok, let's look at this one at a time, since you're obviously happy to actually look at the rules
(some think it will be too scary), I'll refer to the rule numbers rather than quote them.

First, when the thrower has the disc OB, the thrower and the disc are already OB. This does
not result in a turn over. Out of Bounds Turn Overs only happen when a disc "becomes out of
bounds" (XII.A). If the disc is already OB it cannot become OB, so there is no OB Turn Over
possible.

Next, we know that players contacting an OB area are OB (IX.C), but one exception to that
are throwers whose pivot points are IB (IX.C.2). So throwers who have an IB pivot are IB,
even if part of them is touching OB.

You're right that the thrower is obligated to put the disc into play at the appropriate spot on
the field after it goes OB. IX.H is the most applicable rule for this. If the thrower tries to
check the disc at any other spot, then yes you can call Violation based on that rule. More
common though is to call Travel any time the thrower does not establish (and keep) an
appropriate pivot (XVI.J). If the thrower doesn't throw the disc, then the outcome of either
call would be a stoppage and a check, no turn over.

Now before the thrower puts the disc into play at the appropriate spot, the disc is not "In
Play", the disc is "Live" (II.R). Only putting the disc into play at the appropriate spot can
make a Live disc In Play. When the disc is Live the disc is subject to Turn Over, but no legal
passes can be made. So if the thrower drops it, or throws it away, regardless of whether
there was a call, then it's a Turn Over. If the thrower does throw the disc and a call is made
and it is completed, it was not a Legal Pass, and the completion does not stand. The disc will
be returned to the thrower who must put the disc into play at the appropriate spot
(Continuation Rule: XVI.C).

Also, remember that all calls must be called as soon as you notice the violation, so Travel
should be called as soon as the thrower puts the disc into play at the wrong spot.

Is that a little more clear? Fire away with follow-up questions.

Here's anther one for you. The OB handler throws an incomplete pass down the field. "Travel or Violation" is called. Does the new offense check the disc in at where the disc lands or where the disc is thrown?

Back to the one from before, I totally understand "one exception to that are throwers whose pivot points are IB". (IX.C.2) The handler started with the disc with one foot in, one foot out. The marker (defender) does not know which foot is the pivot, can the marker call "violation or travel"?

The handler is straddling when he checks the disc in, isn't that OB?
(this happened to me during a game and I believe the other team said something about it being not allowed. I find it interested so I want to get others opinion on it).

"Here's anther one for you. The OB handler throws an incomplete pass down the field. "Travel
or Violation" is called. Does the new offense check the disc in at where the disc lands or
where the disc is thrown?"

The disc is played from wherever it would have been played had there been no call.
Effectively this is a 'play on' situation (ie it does not require a Check). So, if the disc comes
back IB and stays, then the disc is played where it lays. If the disc stays/becomes OB, then
the OB rules apply.

--

"Back to the one from before, I totally understand "one exception to that are throwers whose
pivot points are IB". (IX.C.2) The handler started with the disc with one foot in, one foot out.
The marker (defender) does not know which foot is the pivot, can the marker call "violation
or travel"?"

Of course not. The marker doesn't have to know which foot is the pivot, the thrower doesn't
even have to know. Though in the case where one foot is IB at the appropriate spot, and the
other foot is OB, it's pretty obvious which is the pivot.

The rule is only violated when the thrower does not set and maintain a pivot at the
appropriate spot. Regardless of which foot (or hand, or knee, etc) winds up being the pivot,
until there is no single body part which remained in constant contact with the appropriate
spot, there is no travel.

A marker never has to know which body part is the pivot. The only question that needs to be
asked to determine travel is: "Does the thrower have a body part which has never moved
from the appropriate spot on the field?" If the answer is "yes" then no travel, if the answer is
"no" then there's a Travel. The fact that there may be multiple parts that meet the criteria is
irrelevant.

--

"The handler is straddling when he checks the disc in, isn't that OB? (this happened to me
during a game and I believe the other team said something about it being not allowed. I find
it interested so I want to get others opinion on it)."

I mentioned this already. IX.C is the only rule which states players can be OB, but throwers
with IB pivots are expressly excluded from IX.C by rule IX.C.2. Therefore, when in possession
of the disc, throwers with IB pivots can't be OB.